Monday

Review of Dominate the Bar Flashcards

I recently received a review copy of the Dominate the Bar MBE flashcards from the good folks at DominateTheBar.com.

There are a lot of bar exam flashcard options out there, and Dominate the Bar is certainly worth considering.

The more than 900 flashcards come in seven groups, corresponding to the MBE categories:  Contracts, Constitutional Law, Criminal Law, Criminal Procedure, Evidence, Torts, and Real Property.  These sets give a thorough overview of the law tested in each area.

While I have not been able to review each card individually, the cards I did review have accurate statements of the law and provide good examples applying the law.   What I really liked about these cards is that they are concise, the way flashcards should be, and not filled with overblown, complicated explanations better suited for a long-form bar review outline.

Each card has numbers front and back.  This is so that you can keep the cards in order since often they build on each other or provide follow-up examples.  I would recommend keeping them in order the first couple times you review them, and then decide how you want to start mixing them up.  I would recommend mixing them up at some point, since reviewing flashcards in the same order every time is akin to reading an outline from start to finish and does not train your recall as well as randomized flashcard review.  (I should note that in a few instances, the answer on the back of one card will be continued on the next card, so you will need to keep those cards together.)

The pictures below show an example of how the cards interrelate.  The first card (no. 57) asks you to explain the basic rule for when a witness can be impeached, while the next card (no. 59) gives you an example fact pattern to apply the impeachment rules.




The cards themselves are printed on quality stock, which should survive even hundreds of viewings.  You can also write on the cards with a ballpoint pen or a pencil if you want to add extra information to the cards, such a mnemonic or reference to a larger outline or bar review book.

If Dominate the Bar flashcards sound like something for you, you can get them directly from dominatethebar.com or from Amazon.  There is also a smartphone app if you prefer digital format over paper.

Wednesday

California Bar Exam Prep Course Matrix

Recently, one of the readers of this blog emailed me a copy of the bar review matrix that he had compiled while determining which bar review course to take to prepare for the California bar exam.

He has generously allowed me to share that matrix with you.  If you are wondering which bar prep course to take, this matrix may help you make your decision.

The matrix contains the names of several bar prep resources available for those preparing for the California bar exam, as well as details about price, location, and more.

Download the matrix by clicking here. (MS-Word file.)

You might also be interested in this guide to studying for the California bar exam for under $500.

Finally, iIf you want to know about additional bar exam resources or are not taking the California bar exam, check out my Ultimate Bar Prep Resource Guide.  (PDF file.)



Friday

How to Decipher MBE Answer Choices


I just stumbled across the site of Rich Klarman, a bar exam tutor in Michigan.

His site has some great bar prep articles available for free download.

I read his article explaining the Formal Structure of MBE Answer Choices (PDF) and recommend it to everyone studying for the bar exam.

As I have written about elsewhere, I feel like the MBE questions are filled with tricks to get you to choose the wrong answer.

Klarman's article spells out some of these tricks.  I wish I had read it before I started studying for the MBE.


Monday

Bar Exam Prep Guide

If you are just getting started with your bar exam preparations, you might want to check out the Ultimate Bar Exam Prep Resource Guide.

It is filled with all sorts of great information about bar exam prep courses, bar exam books, bar exam blogs, and more.  All the resources you need to pass the bar exam.

Check it out.  It is free.  Just click the picture below to view the PDF or right-click to download directly.


Tuesday

Bestselling Bar Exam Prep Materials

I have been publishing this blog since March 2009.  In many posts, I include links to various bar exam products sold on Amazon.com.

Below is a list of the top-10 bar exam preparation products purchased by my blog readers.

If you are looking for good bar prep books or even gifts for law students, this should be a helpful list to get you started.


#1
Passing the Bar board game -- I am a bit surprised that this is the number one seller.  This game is designed to help you review for the MBE and includes some legal trivia questions as well.

#2
Daily Reflections for Bar Exam Study -- A small book containing short inspirational readings to help you get through your bar exam studies.

#3
Scoring High on Bar Exam Essays -- A highly-recommended book by Mary Campbell Gallagher who is the founder of BarWrite, a program designed to help bar takers master the written portions of the bar exam.

#4
Kaplan/PMBR MBE Review Flashcards -- I prefer to make my own flashcards for bar prep, but if you are looking for commercially prepared flashcards, check these out.

#5
Strategies and Tactics for the MBE -- Another strongly recommended book.  This book is especially recommended by bar exam repeaters who had trouble with the MBE the first time around.  I have seen several blog posts and videos in which repeaters state that this is the book that finally helped them make sense of the MBE.

#6
Bar Cards Complete Set -- Another set of popular flashcards, targeted for people taking the California bar exam.

#7
Law in a Flash -- Various subject sets of flashcards from this publisher add up to make it the seventh most popular purchase.

#8
Critical Pass MBE Flashcards -- A recent entry into the bar exam flashcard category.  These have been getting good reviews.

#9
What NOT to Write:  Real Essays, Real Scores, Real Feedback -- One of the best ways to learn is to see actual examples of what works and what doesn't.  This book gives it to you.

#10
Perform Your Best on the Bar Exam Performance Test (MPT) -- Another helpful book from M. C. Gallagher filled with advice and tips about the performance test.

I hope you found something on this list you liked.

PS -- If you need other gift ideas, check out this post.

Photo: http://www.flickr.com/photos/runytry/5188899842/

Saturday

Smarter Review Promo Code

Have you heard of Smarter Review?

It is a relatively new bar review provider offering MBE prep materials and New York bar exam prep materials.

Check it out at www.SmarterReview.com.

And, if you decide to buy their bar prep materials, be sure to use promo code "BarAdvisorInsider" to get a 15% discount on your purchase.

To use the promo code, put it in the Apply Promo Code box you'll see on the check out page:


(If you decide to use the BarAdvisorInsider code, I'll get a small commission too, but there's no extra cost to you.)

Monday

Review of BarEssays.com

If you are looking for some extra help passing the California bar exam, be sure to check out BarEssays.com.  It is an awesome service that has collected a ton of real, graded essays and performance tests for you to review and learn what the California bar graders are looking for in a passing answer.

Check out my video review for more information.




Wednesday

Bar Exam Quick Tip: Review Outlines

When you first start preparing your bar exam outlines, you often worry whether they are good enough to pass the bar exam. The best way to get rid of that anxiety is to look at outlines that prior bar exam passers used.


MBE outlines: http://www.barexammind.com/outlines/mbeoutlines/
California Bar Outlines: http://www.barexammind.com/outlines/california-bar-exam-outlines/
Oregon Bar Outlines: http://www.barexammind.com/outlines/oregon-bar-exam-outlines/

Monday

Study for the California Bar Exam for $500 or Less!

This post is for all the people out there who have to take the California bar exam.

We all know that it costs a lot of money to take a bar prep course, even the "cheap" courses.

Fortunately, it is possible to study for the bar exam without breaking the bank.

I managed to spend "only" $1395 when I studied for the California bar exam.

What I didn't know at the time was that it is possible to spend much less.

To help you explore all the money-saving options, I put together a quick report about how to prepare for the California bar exam for $500 or less.

You can download it here.

It is a quick read and has lots of links to great resources.

If you find it valuable, please pass it along to anyone who you think might like it.

Tuesday

Bar Exam Quick Tip: Get Into Nature

Many studies show that getting in to nature helps with memory and mental stability.  Use this to your advantage while you are studying for the bar exam.


If you found this tip useful, be sure to check out my guide to bar prep materials. It is a free PDF download with no opt-in, so check it out!

Friday

Advice from Bar Exam Repeaters

Advice is always more helpful when you hear it from someone who has gone through what you are going through now.

If you did not pass the bar exam this time, maybe you would like some advice.

Here are some links to posts by bar exam repeaters about what they changed in their preparations in order to help them pass the bar exam:

http://legallyfabulous.blogspot.com/2011/11/so-youfailed-bar-exam.html (Lengthy and informative post by a three-time Illinois bar exam repeater.)

http://jessie-zaylia.blogspot.com/2011/11/how-i-passed-california-bar-exam.html (This is a great video post by a three-time repeater of the California bar exam. Good discussion of what she did differently and how she eased her anxiety.)

http://erickregalado.wordpress.com/2012/05/22/2nd-time-was-the-charm-i-passed-the-california-bar-exam/ (Summary of how one examinee passed the California bar exam on his second try.)

Photo:  http://www.flickr.com/photos/cozumel18/7398664734/

Tuesday

New York Bar Exam

What is it like to take the New York Bar Exam?

This video tells you.

Monday

Bar Exam Tips Slideshow

 
Bar exam tips from BarExamMind

Saturday

Passing the Bar Exam



Awesome bar passage video!

Sunday

Bar Prep Course Twitter Chat

Hey, everyone!

Just a quick note to let you know I'll be participating in a Twitter chat organized by the folks over at the Bar Exam Toolbox on August 29, 2012 at 5pm PST/8pm EST.  I'll be using my @BarExamMind handle.

The topic of the chat will be how to select the right bar exam prep course to meet your needs and help you pass the bar exam.

To follow the chat, just search twitter.com for hashtag #barexamtools.  Feel free to ask any questions you might have during the chat.

If you can't make the chat (or you are reading this after August 29th), check out these posts:
  1. Selecting a bar prep course
  2. Review of AdaptiBar (and $50 off AdaptiBar!)
  3. Studying for the bar exam on a budget
Hope to see you there!

UPDATE:  Here is a transcript of the chat if you'd like to read through it:

Thursday

California First Year Law Student Exam

I came across an interesting case about the FYLSX when I was researching competitive bidding requirements for public entities. (I have no idea either....)

In any event, the case is Bib'le v. Committee of Bar Examiners, 162 Cal.Rptr. 426, 26 Cal.3d 548, 606 P.2d 733 (Cal., 1980) and involves a challenge by a student at an unaccredited law school who wanted to be able to sit for the general California bar exam without having to pass the FYLSX.

The case itself is an interesting read, but the court also summarized the rationale for creating the FYLSX in a footnote.  What I find interesting about the footnote was the court's statement that even in the 1930s, law schools were trying to get as many students as possible so they could earn money and were not looking out for the best interests of their students. Sound familiar?

Here is footnote 6 from the opinion:
The FYLSX is the end result of a 1933 Report of President's Advisory Committee submitted to the Board of Governors of the State Bar. The report recited pressures in some law schools to secure and maintain enrollment of students not qualified to become members of the bar. It was further reported that because unqualified students were not eliminated in many unaccredited law schools, it was not until such students had failed the bar examination after years of study that they realized they would never qualify for admission to the bar. Beginning in 1935 the committee required all first year students to take an examination in first year courses, except for those students receiving first year course instruction in schools approved by the committee.
[photo: http://www.flickr.com/photos/49889874@N05/5580127313/]

Monday

Inspiration from Steve Jobs

Saturday

It Can Be Done!

Friday

February 2013 Bar Exam Tips

At the beginning of each bar exam cycle (in this case, the February 2013 bar exam), I like to re-post a revised and updated version of my Quick Start Guide

This post provides a summary of what I believe are the most important and helpful posts and bar exam tips on this blog and on my other blog:  Bar Exam Mind.  Consider it your "Cliff's Notes" for passing the bar exam.


In my opinion, success on the bar examination is as much about your state of mind as it is about how much and how well you have studied black letter law.

It is my belief that you need to understand yourself and figure out how to remain calm during the preparation and test-taking process. You need to understand the process of diligent preparation for the act of taking the test before you can study appropriately to learn the information needed to pass the bar examination.

Recommended Reading

I recommend that you read my posts about general mental preparation before you read the posts about studying for particular segments of the bar exam.

First, read my posts on (1) diligence, (2) anticipation of conditions, and (3) stress reduction. I suggest that you digest the contents of these posts for a week or so before reading anything else.

Second, once you have begun to implement the ideas and suggestions contained in these three posts on mental preparedness, read the posts about studying for the discrete segments of the bar examination: (1) MBE study and test tips, (2) essay writing tips, and (3) performance test tips.

(Also, if you are taking the Oregon bar exam or the California bar exam, you might want to check out my free MBE OutlinesOregon bar exam outlines or my California bar exam outlines.)

Third, be sure to read my posts about why practice tests matter and lessons learned from analyzing the reasons someone failed the bar exam.

"Learning isn't about memorizing isolated facts; it's about connecting and manipulating them."

If you are feeling overwhelmed just by reading this "quick start" guide or because you have just started studying for the bar exam, you should read my post about how the feeling of being overwhelmed will subside as you work your way through your bar exam preparations.


Next, head on over to my new blog, Bar Exam Mind, and read about creating your bar exam level set and how to use visualization to help you prepare for the exam.

If you are worried about bar exam stress, consider purchasing my strategy guide for how to deal with bar exam stress, anxiety and fear.
In addition, you may want to listen to prior episodes of my bar exam podcast.

For those of you who are looking into using an online MBE prep course, you should check out my review of Adaptibar where you can learn the answer to the question, "Is Adaptibar any good?" and get a $50 discount if you sign up through my affiliate link.

Finally, a few weeks before the start date of the bar exam (and before you make your hotel reservations), I suggest you read my post about how to make the actual test-taking experience a successful one.

Thank you for reading and good luck!

PS -- If you would like a list of bar exam prep resources, be sure to download my Ultimate Bar Exam Prep Resource Guide.

Thursday

MBE Practice Question

Maybe the MBE isn't so hard after all?

(Source:  Courtoons)

Monday

Good Luck on the Bar Exam!

Be Confident!  Do well!


[Photo: http://www.flickr.com/photos/barneymoss/7167245446/]

Friday

Bar Exam Humor



(Source:  Courtoons)

Monday

Cool MBE Test Tip

I recently asked alumni from my law school for advice on passing the bar exam. 

I posted a summary of that advice over here.

But, people continue to leave advice.

One person left a particularly interesting comment about how to take the MBE exam.  I probably would not do it this way, but it sounds really interesting and might work for you.

Here is what she said:

I realized part of the anxiety everyone felt [about the MBE] was jumping around from topic to topic. Instead of following their pattern, I took the first ten minutes to scan each question and identify whether it was torts, con law, etc. Then I did all of the sections together.


I knew property had the longest questions so I did those last. This way you're hedging your answers to your strongest subject matters. Additionally, your brain works on sixteen evidence questions in a row rather than skipping around. You needn't follow their system to beat it.

I think this MBE strategy could help someone who is willing to use 10 minutes of the 3 hour exam block to sort through the questions.  Since most people practice MBE questions one subject at a time, this could be a very effective way of marrying practice testing with application.

What do you think about this MBE test tip?

**********

Need more MBE tips, check out
this post or this podcast.  Also, you can get PDF copies of my free MBE outlines by clicking here.
[Photo: http://www.flickr.com/photos/icanchangethisright/3578961378/]

Sunday

Bar Advice Video

Here is a video put together by the CUNY School of Law in which several students talk about their bar exam experiences. This is a good video and worth watching.

At about 1:50 in the video, the students talk about how they studied and which bar prep course they took. The video includes several repeaters who talk about how they changed their study habits to pass the bar exam on the second attempt.

At about 5:20, they begin to talk about having a regular routine, exercising, and eating right during bar exam studies.

Tuesday

Bar Exam Willpower

Are you having trouble with finding the willpower to study for the bar exam?
 
Check out this video for some interesting strategies for dealing with a lack of willpower.
 



Note: These strategies are applicable to lots of things, not just passing the bar exam.

Buy The Willpower Instinct.

Monday

Some Bar Exam Links


Just a quick post to let you know you should check out my guest post over at BarExamToolbox.  I talk about the difference between routine and schedule and why you should establish a bar exam study routine.

Also, episode 3 of my bar exam podcast is up.  In that episode, I give you some test day tips to help you pass the bar exam.

[Photo: http://www.flickr.com/photos/smemon/5144379598/]

Bar Exam Tips Podcast

I am happy to announce that I have launched my Bar Exam Mind Podcast over at my other blog.

I have been contemplating doing a podcast for some months now, and finally got all of the pieces in place.

The idea behind my bar exam podcast is to give you bar exam tips and advice about how to pass the bar in an easy to use and portable format.

So far, there are two episodes for you to check out:
I hope you enjoy them.

If you would like, you can subscribe to the podcast via iTunes or RSS feed.

Let me know what you think about the podcast in the comments below the Show Notes pages.

Sunday

#BarTips Twitter Chat


I wanted to let you know that I will be participating in a twitter chat organized by @StudentAppeal.  The purpose of the twitter chat is to discuss bar exam tips with anyone out there studying for the bar exam.

So, fire up your Twitter client at 5pm PST/8pm EST on Thursday, May 24, 2012 and then tune in to the #bartips hashtag. 

I'll be tweeting under @barexammind.

For more information, check out this post at thestudentappeal.com.

Wednesday

California Bar Exam Results

The results for the February 2012 California bar exam come out on May 18, 2012. 

The long wait is over.  Good luck everyone!

By the way, does anyone know if any other state reports results after California?

PS -- If you are just starting to study for the July 2012 bar exam in any jurisdiction, check out my bar exam pass list visualization.

Monday

Bar Exam Help -- Get the Resource Guide

Over at my other bar exam blog, I put together the Ultimate Bar Exam Preparation Resource Guide to help you learn about all the bar prep courses, books and information available to students preparing for the bar examination.

This is a free PDF that you can download directly to your computer.  I don't even ask you for your email address.

Click on the picture below to get instant access.

or

Right-click the picture to save it directly to your computer.



I hope it helps.

Saturday

Bar Exam Tips -- July 2012 Bar Exam Prep Guide

At the beginning of each bar exam cycle, I like to re-post a revised and updated version of my Quick Start Guide.  This post provides a summary of what I believe are the most important and helpful posts and bar exam tips on this blog.


In my opinion, success on the bar examination is as much about your state of mind as it is about how much and how well you have studied black letter law.

It is my belief that you need to understand yourself and figure out how to remain calm during the preparation and test-taking process. You need to understand the process of diligent preparation for the act of taking the test before you can study appropriately to learn the information needed to pass the bar examination.

Recommended Reading

I recommend that you read my posts about general mental preparation before you read the posts about studying for particular segments of the bar exam.

First, read my posts on (1) diligence, (2) anticipation of conditions, and (3) stress reduction. I suggest that you digest the contents of these posts for a week or so before reading anything else.

Second, once you have begun to implement the ideas and suggestions contained in these three posts on mental preparedness, read the posts about studying for the discrete segments of the bar examination: (1) MBE study and test tips, (2) essay writing tips, and (3) performance test tips.

(Also, if you are taking the Oregon bar exam or the California bar exam, you might want to check out my Oregon bar exam outlines or my California bar exam outlines.)

Third, be sure to read my posts about why practice tests matter and lessons learned from analyzing the reasons someone failed the bar exam.

"Learning isn't about memorizing isolated facts; it's about connecting and manipulating them."

If you are feeling overwhelmed just by reading this "quick start" guide or because you have just started studying for the bar exam, you should read my post about how the feeling of being overwhelmed will subside as you work your way through your bar exam preparations.


Next, head on over to my new blog, Bar Exam Mind, and read about creating your bar exam level set and how to use visualization to help you prepare for the exam.

If you are worried about bar exam stress, consider purchasing my strategy guide for how to deal with bar exam stress, anxiety and fear.

Finally, a few weeks before the start date of the bar exam (and before you make your hotel reservations), I suggest you read my post about how to make the actual test-taking experience a successful one.

Thank you for reading and good luck!

PS -- If you would like a list of bar exam prep resources, be sure to download my Ultimate Bar Exam Prep Resource Guide.

PPS -- Check out out page!

Wikipedia for Bar Exam Study?

While I was checking my Twitter account the other day, I saw a tweet stating that the tweeter had been using Wikipedia to help her understand the outlines provided by BarBri.

This person was justifiably upset that she had spent $3,000 but had to resort to using a free resource to understand concepts that should have been explained in the paid materials.

This got me thinking.

Could you study for and pass the bar using just free resources?

Probably.

The first thing to do would be to acquire outlines for your jurisdiction. Use any search engine and try searching Docstoc and Scribed
(If you are taking the bar in California or Oregon, you can get my old Oregon bar exam outlines and California bar exam outlines for free.)
Then, you would read through the outlines you get, and use Wikipedia to look up concepts you did not understand in the outlines.

I think this might actually work.  For example, here is the Wikipedia entry for Torts.  It provides a good survey, and even gets into the elements of negligence.

But, it pays short shrift to the intentional torts.  So, look up each one individually.  For instance, here is IIED and battery (with complete explanations of the elements).

What about Constitutional law?  Here is a wiki providing a pretty good explanation of strict scrutiny.  At the end of the wiki, are links to entries about all the other levels of scrutiny (i.e., intermediate scrutiny and rational basis).

Free outlines and Wikipedia, combined with extensive practice of MBE questions, essay questions, and performance tests seems like a possible way to pass the bar exam and save a lot of money.
(Here is where you might need to spend a little money, getting books that have practice MBE questions or signing up for an online service like Adaptibar.  [Click here for $50 off Adaptibar's regular price!]  If you live in a jurisdiction that does not provide sample essay and PT questions on line, you'll need to find a way to get copies of those, such as buy a used Barbri book or order copies from your state's bar association.)

Conclusion

I obviously have not looked into every topic tested on the bar exam, but it certainly appears that the major topics tested on the MBE have sufficient coverage in Wikipedia to enable successful self-study.

Where this free-system could break down is the state-specific areas of testing.

For example, the California bar exam tests community property.  The wiki for community property is good, but maybe a bit too generic.  On the other hand, there are entries for Van Camp and Pereira accounting, so if you searched around, you might be able to get all the information you need.

If anyone tries this, leave a comment and let us all know how it goes.

Sunday

Smarter Review: NY Bar Review Program

For all of you taking the New York bar exam, here is a guest post from Kobelah Bennah of Smarter Review that might be of use to you.

And, if you enter code "BarAdvisorInsider" when you purchase a bar prep course at www.smarterreview.com, you get 15% off your bill.

Take it away, Kobelah....

************************************************************************************

Hello to all the February 2012 Bar Exam test takers out there!

Below I discuss some interesting statistics gleaned from New York bar passage rates that may ease your mind as you study for the upcoming exam. Although these trends were gathered from New York statistics, I see no reason these statistics wouldn't apply to other exams being given this February.

First, although that passage rates are just generally lower in February than they are in July (often 30% lower in New York!), don't fret.  These statistics are not as gloomy as they first appear, especially if you are a first-time test taker!

Your chances are much greater if you are a first-time test taker, especially if you are domestically educated.  In New York, the passage rates for first time test takers in February are usually 15% to 20% greater than they are for repeat takers.  If you were educated at an ABA accredited law school in the United States, your chances also jump up almost 50% higher than the guy sitting near you who was educated elsewhere.

Therefore, if you're about to take the February exam and you are nervous because you've never taken the bar exam before, and you've heard the passage rates are atrocious, don't worry.  The fact that you're new to this is a good thing!

BUT if you were foreign educated or this is not your first time taking the bar exam - there's hope for you, too!

Retakers, your chances of passing increase by how close you were to passing the exam your first time around.  If you were just a few points shy of passing in July, you are much more likely to pass this February.

Also, if you just took the bar in July 2011, and are re-taking it in February, there is good news!  90% of test-takers who take the exam for the first time in July will pass by February of the next year.  Thus, the second time is likely the charm!

Finally, there is great news for all you over-achievers out there.  Passage rates correlate pretty strongly with law school academic achievement, and the predictability of this factor only increases if you also consider your undergraduate success.

Thus, if you were a rockstar in school, you're likely to rock on the bar exam.

Of course, you should not leave your bar exam success up to chance or statistics, but I talk about some of these trends because they eased my mind when I took the New York bar exam in February of last year. Hopefully these trends will ease some pre-test jitters for you, too.

If you're like many February test takers, you may be working full-time, looking for a job, or coming from abroad and, in any of the above cases, you aren't coming straight out of law school with bar-ready material fresh in your head.  Therefore, you may not have a whole lot of time or, you may not have a whole lot of money, to devote to studying for the bar exam.

The best advice I can give you is to find a fast, efficient, focused, affordable, but complete course that can give you what you need (but not a lot more) to pass the bar.  

I found my key to pass the bar at www.smarterreview.com.   [UPDATE:  enter code "BarAdvisorInsider" at checkout and get 15% of your bill at Smarter Review!]

Smarter Review made it possible for me to pass even when I thought I didn't have enough time to study while working full time at a law firm.  I felt so strongly about my bar exam experience that I started out as a Smarter Review student and now I'm a co-owner of the company.

As a recent test taker, I urge all February test takers to check out Smarter Review.  Even if you're not taking the New York exam, Smarter Review can give you the most boiled down, efficient, simple, yet complete MBE preparation out there.  That's half the battle.

Anyway, check us out, especially if you're overwhelmed or behind using your current study course.  It'll make all the difference.  
And to all February test takers, good luck!

Kobelah Bennah
Managing Member
Smarter Review LLC 
www.smarterreview.com

[Photo: http://www.flickr.com/photos/victoriapeckham/491273357/] 
 
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